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Ford Barn

Cartmel

Key Information

Sleeps:5

Star Rating:VE 5 Star Gold Award

Changeover:Friday

Pets:Pets - See Property Inventory

Other: Easy Access For Cartmel Races
Wi-Fi Broadband

To See More Cottages In And Around Cartmel See Our Cartmel Collection

Things To Do While Staying At Ford Barn

Our Explore More Pages showcase the best along with some of the lesser-known attractions of the Lake District. We want you to get the most from your experience whilst staying in this unique area by highlighting some of our favourite places, along with those of the owners and our friends most loved walks and attractions.

Some days you may wish to stay close to home, on others, set off and visit further away landscapes. Here are just a few of the magnificent places we love, both near and far, always remembering that nowhere is more than a hour to and hour and a quarter drive away, and the journey through the landscape is always part of the days enjoyment.

We would also love to hear about you memorable moments so we can share it with others. 
Either email or post us on Facebook, Google+ or twitter or even send a post card.

Exploring the area near Ford Barn

Cartmel

If you are staying in or near Cartmel then prepare to eat! Apart from being the prettiest village in the Lake District, with stunningly beautiful architecture, it has the most delicious food you will find anywhere. Simon Rogan's L'Enclume has featured on TV, has a Michelin Star and has just toppled Heston’s Fat Duck as the Good Food Guides Numero Uno eatery. Next we have Rogan’s more casual Rogan & Company, I think just as nice but half the price. Then there are the four pubs, I like them all, all serving local ales and decent pub grub. So there you are - if you love dining this is the place for you.


Hampsfell - Bread - Beer - Cheese - Salami and a Rug

First, stroll round to Unsworth Yard and select a few ripe cheeses, then into the bread shed for a crusty loaf. Ponder a while and choose a few fine ales from the micro brewery, then round to the village store for some salami.

Next, drive up Haggs Lane and onto the Grange Fell Road, park at the Golf Club and walk onto Hampsfell, a magnificent limestone ridge rising up above the village. The walk to the summit is quite easy, where you will find the most amazing natural lime stone pavement, the old stone Hospice, with its stone seats, little fireplace, and the flat roof with an unusual summit viewfinder, along with the most amazing panoramic view out across the bay and back towards the Cumbrian Mountains.

Stay a while, and chomp away happily with the most stunning view to fill your gaze. The Rug? Standards must always be kept, and it can get windy, so cuddle up and enjoy.

Take photos of yourself for fond memories.

 


Humphrey Head - Cartmel Peninsula

A large fold of limestone rock jutting out into the Morecambe Bay, it is a real pirate bay cove with a cave set up in the cliff face. Another fact about HH is that the last wolf in England was supposed shot here – truth or fiction nobody is quite sure.

It is easy to get to by car, with parking right by the shore. Explore the sands under the cliff, where there are plenty of rock pools with little fish and crabs. You can go up on to the scar for some super views. What you do not do is venture out from the edge, as we all know the sands are dangerous, with sinking sands and a tide that can easily catch you out. That apart it is a greaty short venture especially with children, On a nice day take a picnic to extend you visit at the quite interesting little spot

 


Fell Foot Park - Lake Windermere

A nice day out for both adults and children is to visit Fell Foot at he the southern basin of Lake Windermere. Children’s adventure playground, waterside cafe, rowboat hire, fishing and lake swimming. Finish off the day with an evening meal at either the Swan Hotel at Newby Bridge or The Lakeside Hotel at Lakeside.

 


High Dam - Finsthwaite Newby Bridge

The big walks lie to the north, both in the south and the north of Cumbria, but a few miles east at Finsthwaite at the head of the Cartmel Peninsula you should try High Dam, the prettiest of small waters and little known, it is easy to walk the whole circumference.

There are two routes up to the tarn. The first is a gentle winding track, the second and only for the steady of foot, the old riverbed. It is quite rocky but great fun and more direct. A picnic is a must as is mushrooming, but only pick if you know your fungi. It is a popular place for pro mush pickers and I am sure they would guide you if asked nicely. A picnic is a must and in summer a paddle is a joy. 

For lunch you should try the Lakeside Hotel. Excellent food with a formal dining room, a contemporary bistro, also a conservatory overlooking the lake.

 


Three Country Houses On The Cartmel Peninsula

If country house bagging is for you, then around or near the peninsula are three of the finest houses in England, each within a short dive of one another.

Sizergh Castle - The first is Sizergh Castle (as we all know it, the proper title being Sizergh House) is a beautiful medieval house with wonderful gardens and estate grounds. An imposing building, it stands sentinel at the gateway to the Lake District, and is maintained by The National Trust. There is plenty to do and see, along with a café, pub and farm shop.

 


Levens Hall - Next we have beautiful Levens Hall is a fine example of the grand country house. The house is open to the public and is a fine example of its kind. What is special are the topiary gardens, a huge collection of the weird and the wonderful, sculptured from box and yew. There are secret garden rooms, wooded walkways and a fine ornamental pond, which for those that followed the BBC's bodice busting, head rolling, Henry VIII, will recognise it as one of the locations used in the series.

 


Holker Hall, known locally as Hooker Hall, along with its Gardens is located in Cark in Cartmel, and makes for good half days outing. The House is open to the public but my preference is to explore the grounds, finishing with lunch at the food hall. Throughout the year there are shows and market fairs so it is worth checking Holker's website. 

 


Arnside Morecambe Bay Walk

Not many will know this walk as it lies on the southern shores of the Morecambe Bay. The drive is easy, via Levens, down to Milnthorpe and round to Arnside. You start from the pier and simply follow the shoreline for as far as you fancy. Rock pools, limestone cliffs, wooded headland and miles and miles of shimmering sand, with a view back to the Cumbrian Mountains.

NOTE

The sands are dangerous as they are magnificent, and only the shrimp fishermen and the sands guides venture out from the shoreline with their tractors. For us mere mortals it is enough to wonder at the seemingly never ending miles of shimmering silver sand, the birdlife and to thrill as the tide with its bore rushes in on its twice daily cycle.

Do give it a go and remember to take a camera, along with a light picnic, where you are sure find the perfect spot among the rock pools or up on the low cliffs to while away some time before retuning home.

Morecambe Bay Cross Bay Walks. It is still possible to cross the sands, still a designated public highway, by joining in with a guided walk. These are led by the renowned Cedric Robinson MBE and Queens Guide, also by Alan Sledmore. For details and walk dates see the links.


Exploring further afield of Ford Barn

A packed lunch, and around the foot of Ullswater for the best walk ever.

This is the one walk everybody should do. The track starts from the southern basin of Ullswater, going all the way to Howtown. Your journey takes you through the most splendid fell and moorland, with a view of the serpentine lake always there to keep you company.

Take a camera for some stunning shots of yourself in a cracking setting. If you make it to Howtown, you can catch a launch back to Glenridding, a splendid way to finish the day - if not you will have to return the way you came.

PS. Check the boat times.  

 


The Fairfield Horseshoe Round - Above Ambleside & Rydal

The Fairfield Horseshoe is one of the classic Lake District rounds - a splendid walk taking in all the peaks surrounding Rydal. The ridges are linked together with an ascent of Fairfield and offer fine high level walking with only the minimum up and down once their peaks have been gained. The views are stunning with the best the summit of Fairfield.

Most of the Lake District peaks are visible from the top and it's the perfect place to view Helvellyn. Weather Note – It is a large area, and the walk is best done in fine clear conditions, as if the weather closes in you can become disorientated – That apart, it’s a super walk, and who wants to walk in the rain or mist anyway - no views! The walk starts from Nook End Farm, up Nook Lane, just off the Kirkstone Pass 

 


Coniston Village & The Boating Centre

Coniston lies in the lea of the mighty Old Man, a mountain for everybody. The village has some good pubs, and is very much a Cumbrian place, not to many fancy tourist shops. At the Boating Centre you can hire rowing boats, canoes, kayaks, sailing dinghies and little motorboats, great for getting out on the water and exploring the bays, beaches and coves, even more perfect with a picnic. Take a towel, as the lake is great for wild swimming. The Centre also hire road and mountain bikes which can be great fun.

There are lake cruises that make for a lovely day on the water, using them as a waterbus to stop off at the attractions around the lake such as Brantwood, home of John Ruskin.

The mountain and its valliys are excellent for walking and mountain biking, with routes to suit all abilities, and nearby is the mighty Grizedale Forest. There then, a place with much to do, and you can explore more by going to our Lakeland Guide Pages.


Tarn Hows - A Picture Book Water

In contrast to the larger lakes, Coniston’s majestic vastness, Ullswaters serpentine beauty, Tarn Hows is a romantic, picture book little tarn, set in the fells between Coniston and Hawkshead. Tarn How’s offers an accessible circular (1¾ miles) walk through beautiful countryside, with grand mountain views. The hard surfaced circular track makes it possible for wheelchairs and buggies, and the National Trust have made available the 'The Tramper', an all-terrain mobility scooter, suitable for those who can use handlebar steering and controls. It's part of the NT commitment to make more of our beautiful places accessible to those who are less physically able.

 

 


Rydal Water

Rydal Water to Grasmere is one of our most beautiful walks, taking in two tarns, and fairly easy. Drive out through Ambleside, on towards Grasmere. Look for the signpost that says Loughrigg. Cross the little Pelter bridge and you will see a small car park.

Follow the track up the hill to the east shore of Rydal Water. One of the prettiest lakes, the path is easy to follow. We take the high path, which gives the best views and is where you will find the two caves. To extend the day, carry onto Grasmere, another delightful tarn. Take a picnic and spend some real time relaxing.

 


There then are a few ideas for you to try. To get the most from you visit, do have a look at our Lakeland Guide Pages, the links to the many attractions, and of course explore the wider Internet for more wonderful areas and things to.