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Millers Loft

Lindale - Nr Newby Bridge And Cartmel

Key Information

Sleeps:2

Star Rating:VE 4 Star

Changeover:Friday

Pets:No Pets

Other: Wi-Fi Broadband

See Also - The Old Pottery  

Easy Access For Cartmel Races

Things To Do While Staying At Millers Loft

Our Explore More Pages showcase the best along with some of the lesser-known attractions of the Lake District. We want you to get the most from your experience whilst staying in this unique area by highlighting some of our favourite places, along with those of the owners and our friends most loved walks and attractions.

Some days you may wish to stay close to home, on others, set off and visit further away landscapes. Here are just a few of the magnificent places we love, both near and far, always remembering that nowhere is more than a hour to and hour and a quarter drive away, and the journey through the landscape is always part of the days enjoyment.

We would also love to hear about you memorable moments so we can share it with others. 
Either email or post us on Facebook, Google+ or twitter or even send a post card.

Owner Diana's Favourite Things

First and formost would have to be... all a very short distance from Lindale...
 
Walking on Hampsfell. (see pics above)
This walk has spectacular views accross the bay to Arnside and Lancashire, around the coast towards Ulverston, and the fells and hills of Coniston old man, Langdales and beyond.  It is not difficult and there are long, short and circular options.  Fabulous in any weather and the Hospice tower at the top with it's handy dial and viewing roof can identify 360 degrees of visible landmarks. www.walkingforum.co.uk (Hampsfell Hospice). Drop down to Cartmel for lunch or better still pick up a tastey filled baguette at the wee cabin (what's it called?) in Grange for a memorable picnic!
Good Map of walks and info available: Limestone Landscapes, the Grange Pavements.
 
If you like looking at interesting 'Old Stuff' The Barn at Low Newton is only 5 minutes away, take the A590 towards Ulvertson after about two miles take a right to Low and High Newton.
www.yewtreebarn.co.uk for opening times etc, a rambling Lake District barn stuffed with goodies and a tucked away cafe for coffee and cake, or lunch.
 
For a great dining experience or just supping on some of the best ales available;
The Masons Arms at Strawberry Bank is well worth a visit, be sure to book for an evening meal, it's pretty popular.  They've created some individual 'dining rooms' upstairs or you can sit outside in the sun.  Northwest's Pub of the Year 2012.www.masonsarmsstrawberrybank.co.uk
 
A really lovely traffic free drive or cycle route, take it nice and slow along the small country lanes over the fells and along the Winster Valley, you won't find this on any website so be sure to take a good map and expect the unexpected, maybe an Art exhibition at Witherslack, wonderful bluebells and coppiced woodland walks, Halecat nursery, or a climb up  Whitbarrow Scar, SSSI and a National Nature Reserve.  Park near Witherslack Hall and Equestrian Centre, (Riding lessons and Treks, booked in advance www.witherslackridingschool.co.uk )
Take the Whitbarrow leaflet with maps, it's easy to get lost! 
St Anthony's church - Cartmell Fell, www.visitcumbria.com  built in 1504 has original features and fine woodwork, and views of Winster Valley, spectacular when daffs are out in the cemetary.  Lots of detours and circular routes back to Lindale.  Booklet of walks around Withersalck at the cottage.

Exploring the area near Millers Loft

Eggerslack Wood & Hampsfell

This delightful walk is virtually on your doorstep, and where Clare walks our dogs each week.

Best approached from Grange over Sands, taking the narrow lane behind the library, you will spot the regulars parking place. The woodland is a tranquil place, with cool glades of native trees, abundant wildlife and undergrowth of holly, ivy and ferns. Come spring the floor is carpeted with bluebells, anemone, celandine and wild garlic, where the only sound is of the birds and the occasional drum roll of a woodpecker.

The northern boundary of the woods is the gateway onto Hampsfell. A geological marvel, this is one of the finest Limestone Pavements in the UK. As you climb the slopes to the summit the view is panoramic, out across the Morecambe Sands and around to the Cumbrian Mountains.

The highest point of the fell is just over 300m, and is marked by an old stone Hospice, with its stone seats, little fireplace, and the flat roof with an unusual summit viewfinder. It was built in 1846 on the old ancient route to the priory, where it still offers shelter to travelers. 

 


Arnside Morecambe Bay Walk

Not many will know this walk as it lies on the southern shores of the Morecambe Bay. The drive is easy, via Levens, down to Milnthorpe and round to Arnside. You start from the pier and simply follow the shoreline for as far as you fancy. Rock pools, limestone cliffs, wooded headland and miles and miles of shimmering sand, with a view back to the Cumbrian Mountains.

NOTE

The sands are dangerous as they are magnificent, and only the shrimp fishermen and the sands guides venture out from the shoreline with their tractors. For us mere mortals it is enough to wonder at the seemingly never ending miles of shimmering silver sand, the birdlife and to thrill as the tide with its bore rushes in on its twice daily cycle.

Do give it a go and remember to take a camera, along with a light picnic, where you are sure find the perfect spot among the rock pools or up on the low cliffs to while away some time before retuning home.

Morecambe Bay Cross Bay Walks. It is still possible to cross the sands, still a designated public highway, by joining in with a guided walk. These are led by the renowned Cedric Robinson MBE and Queens Guide, also by Alan Sledmore. For details and walk dates see the links.


Humphrey Head - Cartmel Peninsula

A large fold of limestone rock jutting out into the Morecambe Bay, it is a real pirate bay cove with a cave set up in the cliff face. Another fact about HH is that the last wolf in England was supposed shot here – truth or fiction nobody is quite sure.

It is easy to get to by car, with parking right by the shore. Explore the sands under the cliff, where there are plenty of rock pools with little fish and crabs. You can go up on to the scar for some super views. What you do not do is venture out from the edge, as we all know the sands are dangerous, with sinking sands and a tide that can easily catch you out. That apart it is a greaty short venture especially with children, On a nice day take a picnic to extend you visit at the quite interesting little spot

 


Gummers How - Overlooking Lake Windermere

A simple, easy walk, Gummers How lies just above Newby Bridge on the Bowness road. Park up at the NT parking space and from here you can scramble up onto Gummers How for a view spectacular of the lake. The surrounding fells here are to be explored and it is worth just pottering around, and maybe a picnic with the most splendid backdrop. 
 Make sure you take a camera for some memorable images of your stay in the Lakes.

 


Fell Foot Park - Lake Windermere

A nice day out for both adults and children is to visit Fell Foot at he the southern basin of Lake Windermere. Children’s adventure playground, waterside cafe, rowboat hire, fishing and lake swimming. Finish off the day with an evening meal at either the Swan Hotel at Newby Bridge or The Lakeside Hotel at Lakeside.

 


Exploring further afield of Millers Loft

Blea Tarn

The prettiest little tarn set in the mountains with woodland to explore, a stunning view of the Langdales, along with being the perfect place for a picnic.

From Coniston follow the A935 and turn left before the B5343. From Ambleside follow the A935 and turn right after the B5343 heading for Little Langdale. Where the road splits after Little Langdale Tarn, turn right on to the Blea Tarn road, you will see the tarn from the road.

 


Rydal Water

Rydal Water to Grasmere is one of our most beautiful walks, taking in two tarns, and fairly easy. Drive out through Ambleside, on towards Grasmere. Look for the signpost that says Loughrigg. Cross the little Pelter bridge and you will see a small car park.

Follow the track up the hill to the east shore of Rydal Water. One of the prettiest lakes, the path is easy to follow. We take the high path, which gives the best views and is where you will find the two caves. To extend the day, carry onto Grasmere, another delightful tarn. Take a picnic and spend some real time relaxing.

 


Thirlmere

Thirlmere lies north of Grasmere, just beyond Dunmail Raise, heading towards Keswick, and is owned by North West Water. It is open to the public and there are parking laybys along the west shore, giving access to some nice woodland walks and lakeside footpaths, which are conservation areas maintained by the British Conservation Society.

The best viewpoint is at Hause Point on the west. You climb some metal steps up to the top of large rock, complete with garden seat, where you get a fine view across the water of Dummail Raise. The lake is very quiet and crystal clear so if you want to be out of the crowds, yet not to have to negotiate winding passes to the more remote waters, then Thirlmere will do very nicely for lakeside exploration, excellent atmosphere and ideal for family picnics.

 


Wastwater and Scafell

Wastwater is without doubt the most haunting and dramatic of all the lakes. The view across the water is to Scafell, Great Gable, flanked by Kirkfell and Lingmell. If the mist rolls in the mood is dark, and the knowledge that the waters drop down to some 258 feet adds to the drama. The lake is three miles long and half a mile wide with an easy walk along the west shore with plenty of places to picnic. The screes have a sort of track at the foot, but it is exceptionally hard going and I would strongly advise against attempting this difficult route. At the head of the lake is a very small village and the famous Wasdale Head Inn, much loved by climbers and serves excellent ale, good bar food and has a pro - climbing shop. Hidden away in a little field, behind a standing of fir trees, stands St Olaf’s Church. Said to be the smallest church in England, the little graveyard has memorials to climbers killed in the Himalayas, Scafell and Great Gable.

Scafell Pike, which at 978 meters it is the highest peak in England and considered one of the most difficult of climbs in the Lake District. Next is Scafell, which at 964 meters is the second highest peak in England and offers stunning views over Wastwater to the west and the Langdale Pikes to the east. Then there is Great Gable, Kirkfell and Lingmell, these along with a host of other peaks, pikes, needles and crags. It goes without saying that these are big climbs and you must acquaint your self with the area, get maps, check weather and equip well with the right clothing. I sometimes think that for some, going a comfortable part of the way, still getting some fantastic views and memorable photographs, is far better than overstretching ones ability. 

 


There then are a few ideas for you to try. To get the most from you visit, do have a look at our Lakeland Guide Pages, the links to the many attractions, and of course explore the wider Internet for more wonderful areas and things to.